Swiss Eu Customs Agreement

An updated overview of the Swiss free trade agreements network can be found in the www.seco.admin.ch section. In addition to trade in goods, the new agreements often address other aspects, including the protection of intellectual property rights, trade in services, investment, public procurement and technical regulations. These are so-called “second generation agreements.” Switzerland signed a free trade agreement with the then European Economic Community in 1972, which came into force in 1973. [2] Switzerland participated in the negotiations of the EEA agreement with the EU and signed it on 2 May 1992 and applied for EU membership on 20 May 1992. In a Swiss referendum on 6 December 1992, membership of the EEA was rejected. Subsequently, the Swiss government suspended EU accession negotiations until further notice. By ratifying the second round of bilateral agreements, the Federal Council in 2006 lowered the characterisation of Switzerland`s full adherence to a “strategic objective” to an “option”. Membership continued to be the government`s objective and a “long-term goal” of the Federal Council until 2016, when Switzerland`s request, which had been frozen, was withdrawn. [25] [26] The request was adopted in June by the Council of States and then by the Bundesrat. [27] [28] [5] In a letter dated 27 July, the Federal Council informed the Presidency of the Council of the European Union that it was withdrawing its request. [29] Types of accumulation: bilateral accumulation: only with primary subjects of the two free trade partners (bilateral) (for example.

B, Switzerland-Japan or AELE-Colombia). Diagonal accumulation: possible with primary subjects of several free trade partners, as all apply the same country of origin rules (e.g.B. EU-EFTA-Turkey). Cumulative euro-med: this is also possible with primary materials from Mediterranean countries, since all the free trade partners concerned apply the same country of origin rules and there are agreements between them. Participating countries: Egypt, Algeria, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Syria, Tunisia, the West Bank and Gaza Strip, as well as the Faroe Islands. Effective 1 January 2012, the countries of the Western Balkans were also admitted to the Euro-med cumulative zone: Albania, Croatia, Macedonia and Serbia. Cumulative with the EU is not yet possible and does not apply to agricultural products mentioned in Chapters 1 to 24. Pan-European accumulation: with primary materials from EFTA, the EU or Turkey. Full accumulation: the appropriate treatment must not take place on the customs territory of a single country, but can be carried out throughout the territory of a free trade agreement. Full accumulation is only provided for under the AELE-Tunisia free trade agreement. The goods agreements between Switzerland and the EU include measures to ensure the free movement of goods.

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